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Slow fashion summer: recap

It’s over. The slow fashion summer has come to an end. My experiences? I’ll tell you!

Slow fashion summer: what have I learnt?

Three months ago, on the 21th of July, I committed to take part in the slow fashion summer. We agreed on not buying anything new for three full months. Thrifting, swapping and vintage shopping was allowed.

I will leave all the details on how much water we saved and how great this was for the earth out. By now, everyone knows we should be shopping less.

But besides all these environmental issues, this challenge taught me a lot.

I’ve learnt to appreciate what I already have. During these three months, I decided to clean out my wardrobe. Everything what was cluttering and what didn’t spark joy, I placed in different bags. One for sale, one for charity, one for a swap party, and one for storage. The one for storage I’d put away, so I could, and still can, see if I really miss it or not. And when I need something new, I can have a look at those clothes, before buying something new.
This decluttering session is taking SO MUCH TIME. Organising, searching, trying, experimenting. With the clothes I have, I tried to make new combinations, because I tend to always pick the same items. However, I have so much more golden pieces that I could easily fit in, when I just spend a little more time of think out new ways of wearing it. For example, I had a black blazer, bought many many years ago. I even remember, because I bought this in high school for my very first internship at a chic hotel. Kinda awkward. However, I’ve never worn it ever since, because I thought it was too chic, too manly, too whatever excuse I was making. But I KNEW, this was a key piece and it shouldn’t be that hard to combine. So I looked on youtube and pinterest, read many blogs with tips and tricks and finally started making combinations myself. And you know what? Now I’m rocking that old blazer!

Another thing I’ve learnt is how to distinguish craving from needs. When I was still shoppNMT6R8F_mu.jpging, especially fast fashion, I was having bad cravings for a lot of new style items. Not everything, I never understood the trend of a cut out turtle neck top for example… But those cravings didn’t fulfil my need. So in the end, I had a closet full of clothing, and still nothing to wear. Nothing didn’t match that well, because I didn’t have any basics and everything was just pretty extraordinary. But because it’s hard to find basics second hand, I now know, that when I buy something new, it doesn’t have to be “different” or “extraordinary”, it rather can be simple and chic. This will help me create a better working wardrobe.

The last thing I will focus on in this article, is style. I’ve been noticing for quite a while now, maybe a year or one and half, that my clothes didn’t represent who I am anymore. I felt always a little childish when I was wearing my colourful fast fashion clothing. However, I feel I’m getting older and I want to look more professional. Not the full suit, blouse and pumps kinda professional, but more the jeans, ankle boots and black blazeIMG_4206.jpgr kinda chic. The more timeless look. And I felt pretty bad about not wanting those old clothes anymore, but they were just not me and didn’t spark joy to me anymore. So that’s why I’ve been selling a lot of items, to anyone who would love to wear them. And I think that’s okay. Clothes make a statement and they will most likely empower you. In the end, it’s all about not throwing them in the bin. Always sell, swap, donate or recycle.

This slow fashion summer made me thinking and made me realise. And everything I’ve learnt, I will keep with me. I’m even thinking: I should do this every year. Maybe even twice. I’ll keep this in the middle, but maybe I’m in for a slow fashion winter. How about you?

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